Tag Archives: replication

What’s the deal with Push Button Replications?

| December 6, 2018

Reproduction and replication of research findings can improve the quality and reliability of research. The recent credibility crisis in the field of psychology, has sparked a huge discussion on the reliability of research findings in all fields and critics have expressed strong doubts over replicability of published research. It should be safe to assume that
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Making replication research relevant for international organizations: A 3ie-IFAD post-event conversation

After 6 years, 3ie’s replication programme is finishing its fourth round of 3ie-funded replication studies. In recognition of this round’s completion, 3ie and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) recently hosted a joint engagement event, Financial services for the poor programmes – verifying evidence for policymaking. Ben (3ie) and Michael (IFAD) co-hosted the event.
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The role of replication in revising WHO guidelines: the case of TB and HIV co-infection

and | March 23, 2018

World Tuberculosis Day 2018 The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the timing of treatments for Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infection have not been revised since 2011. New research findings suggest that they are due for an update. The current standards recommend initiating anti-retroviral therapy (ART) within 2 weeks for HIV and TB co-infected individuals
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What’s first for replication studies is what’s next for 3ie’s replication programme

Many consider pure replication, where the replication researcher starts with the original data set and writes code to recreate the published results according to the methods described in the publication, to be the second step in replication analysis. So, what is the first? The first step is checking whether the original authors’ code can be
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Reflections on replication research: a conversation with Paul Winters

| November 3, 2015

Replication research is often the space of junior researchers. As a well-cited research economist, with multiple international organisation affiliations, Paul Winters stands out in this space. I recently caught up with Paul to discuss his co-authored replication study of Galiani’s and Schargrodsky’s influential paper Property rights for the poor: Effects of land titling. Galiani’s and
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