Tag Archives: mixed methods

Reflections on the impact of agricultural certification on well-being

| October 3, 2017

Carlos Oya and colleagues recently published a systematic review of agricultural certification schemes that stands out for me as useful research for informing policy and programming. Why do I say that? Agricultural certification schemes set and monitor compliance to voluntary standards with the objective of making production socially sustainable and terms of trade fairer for smallholder
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Making participation count

and | January 9, 2014

Toilets get converted into temples, and schools are used as cattle sheds. These are stories that are part of development lore. They illustrate the poor participation of ‘beneficiaries’ in well-intentioned development programmes. So, it is rather disturbing that millions of dollars are spent on development programmes with low participation, when we have evidence that participation
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M&E: A tale of two brothers

| December 17, 2013

Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) are always mentioned together but in practice these two disciplines pretty much evade each other. This is despite the fact that they could be highly beneficial to each other, and if carefully combined, also to the intervention. Howard White in his opening remarks at 3ie’s recent Measuring Results conference emphasised the
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Of sausages and systematic reviews

Making better use of existing evidence
| March 18, 2013

“Literature reviews are like sausages… I don’t eat sausages as I don’t know what goes into them.” Dean Karlan said this to an unfortunate researcher at a conference recently. The ‘sausage problem’ puts in a nutshell why at 3ie we favour the scientific approach to evidence synthesis — evidence as encapsulated by the systematic review.
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