Tag Archives: evaluation

How qual improves quant in impact evaluations

| September 28, 2018

Bridging divides, be they across ethnicities, religions, politics or, indeed, genders, is never easy.  There have been many books written about them, including some that made millions – for example, John Gray’s idea that men and women come from different planets, Mars and Venus respectively, is apparently the best-selling hard cover non-fiction book ever. One
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Third party monitoring in volatile environments – do the benefits outweigh the risks?

and | January 30, 2018

Writing on the What Work’s World Bank Group blogsite last July, Lauren Kelly and Marie Gaarder called for a “wide debate” about the important issues raised by the increasing trend of development agencies to use third parties to carry out monitoring, data collection and other work in fragile and conflicted-affected locations too risky for their
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Is independence always a good thing?

| May 1, 2014

Evaluation departments of development agencies have traditionally jealously guarded their independence. They are separate from the operational side of agencies, sometimes entirely distinct, as in the case of UK’s Independent Commission for Aid Impact or the recently disbanded Swedish Agency for Development Evaluation. Staff from the evaluation department, or at least the head, are often
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Institutionalising evaluation in India

| March 26, 2014

I recently attended the launch of the Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) in India – an event that marks the beginning of an era of evidence-based policymaking in India. Are we being overly optimistic and maybe somewhat naïve in thinking this? Maybe. The launch event, which happened in Delhi, included an eclectic mix of presenters and
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Making participation count

and | January 9, 2014

Toilets get converted into temples, and schools are used as cattle sheds. These are stories that are part of development lore. They illustrate the poor participation of ‘beneficiaries’ in well-intentioned development programmes. So, it is rather disturbing that millions of dollars are spent on development programmes with low participation, when we have evidence that participation
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