10 years of research transparency: lessons learned

| May 29, 2018

The 1854 London cholera outbreak prompted Dr John Snow’s famous “experiment…on the grandest scale”, widely cited as one of the earliest known natural experiments. By comparing cholera deaths among households that received a supply of contaminated water with those receiving a cleaner supply, Snow sought to test his theory (against prevailing wisdom) that cholera is
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The role of replication in revising WHO guidelines: the case of TB and HIV co-infection

and | March 23, 2018

World Tuberculosis Day 2018 The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on the timing of treatments for Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infection have not been revised since 2011. New research findings suggest that they are due for an update. The current standards recommend initiating anti-retroviral therapy (ART) within 2 weeks for HIV and TB co-infected individuals
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Agricultural innovation: where does the evidence lie?

  Improving agricultural innovations and technologies in developing countries is of paramount importance to increase agricultural production and income sustainability. Although many agricultural technologies are available, adoption remains low among smallholder farmers. To identify and map the existing evidence on the effects of agricultural innovation interventions on outcomes related to productivity and the sustainable growth
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Third party monitoring in volatile environments – do the benefits outweigh the risks?

and | January 30, 2018

Writing on the What Work’s World Bank Group blogsite last July, Lauren Kelly and Marie Gaarder called for a “wide debate” about the important issues raised by the increasing trend of development agencies to use third parties to carry out monitoring, data collection and other work in fragile and conflicted-affected locations too risky for their
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